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Civil Unrest & OSHA Guidance

This presentation will provide tangible action steps for those in HR and leaders managing workplaces to implement clear and consistent communication and activity, plus insight and tips to ensure you are functioning and acting responsibly during the current crisis.

Wednesday,
September 2, 2020
Time:
10:00 AM PDT | 01:00 PM EDT
Duration:
60 Minutes
Webinar Id:
703251
Register Now

Live Version

$145. One Participant
$295. Group Attendees

Recorded Version

$195. One Participant
$395. Group Attendees

Combo Offers

Live + Recorded
$289 $340   One Participant

Live + Recorded
$599 $690   Group Attendees

Group Attendees: Any number of participants

Recorded Version: Unlimited viewing for 6 months ( Access information will be emailed 24 hours after the completion of live webinar)

Overview:

The circumstances surrounding the recent outbreaks of violence and civil unrest developed hourly (let alone daily), and with the rapid-fire nature of modern media and social media channels, details will vary from broadcast to broadcast, leaving many in the workforce in confusion and fear.

Most do not know what next steps they should take and they are either paralyzed by fear, worried about their future or in the shock and denial phase of the crisis.

Having a plan that works for you and not against you is the best course of action for any business, however for many, especially those who have not implemented crisis management plans in the past, we have entered new territory.

The events of the past several months are creating a constantly changing national condition which leave employers feeling the pressure and unfortunately due to the overload of news and information (often contradicting itself) leaders are running the risk of being ambitious in their communication and actions with employees.

Ambiguity leads to confusion and creates more uncertainty and fear. This is something we all need to avoid. Thankfully, there are steps employers can take to prepare their workforce, encourage certain behaviors and manage the business environment effectively, so employees can continue to remain engaged and reduce the risk of panic and concern.

These steps are the basis of crisis management and often seem commonsense, however, in a crisis it is more difficult to remain calm and think or behave in a considered way. It is vital for HR professionals that reasonable practices are established and followed, plans put in place and implemented, and most importantly, any action taken has been thoroughly understood, investigated, checked and measured in order to avoid longer term damage to the business.

Every day the boundaries and goal-posts are moving, so it is vitally important that leaders in industry, business and human resources are kept as up to date as possible to avoid generating fear, adding to the confusion or creating workplace dysfunction. We need to know all we can in order to adapt, innovate and implement new ways of operating during a crisis. This is why clear communication, accurate information and considered action are required.

Why you should Attend: The circumstances surrounding the recent outbreaks of violence and civil unrest developed hourly (let alone daily), and with the rapid-fire nature of modern media and social media channels, details will vary from broadcast to broadcast, leaving many in the workforce in confusion and fear. Most do not know what next steps they should take and they are either paralyzed by fear, worried about their future or in the shock and denial phase of the crisis.

Having a plan that works for you and not against you is the best course of action for any business, however for many, especially those who have not implemented crisis management plans in the past, we have entered new territory. The events of the past several months are creating a constantly changing national condition which leave employers feeling the pressure and unfortunately due to the overload of news and information (often contradicting itself) leaders are running the risk of being ambitious in their communication and actions with employees.

Ambiguity leads to confusion and creates more uncertainty and fear. This is something we all need to avoid. Thankfully, there are steps employers can take to prepare their workforce, encourage certain behaviors and manage the business environment effectively, so employees can continue to remain engaged and reduce the risk of panic and concern.

These steps are the basis of crisis management and often seem commonsense, however, in a crisis it is more difficult to remain calm and think or behave in a considered way. It is vital for HR professionals that reasonable practices are established and followed, plans put in place and implemented, and most importantly, any action taken has been thoroughly understood, investigated, checked and measured in order to avoid longer term damage to the business.

Every day the boundaries and goal-posts are moving, so it is vitally important that leaders in industry, business and human resources are kept as up to date as possible to avoid generating fear, adding to the confusion or creating workplace dysfunction. We need to know all we can in order to adapt, innovate and implement new ways of operating during a crisis. This is why clear communication, accurate information and considered action are required.

Areas Covered in the Session:
  • How to start with a simple plan and move forward from there
  • Cutting through the confusion of the OSHA Emergency Preparedness and Response guidance
  • What every employer should be considering
  • What part of your plan should you communicate to your employees
  • Training your employees and actively engage their feedback
  • How to support your employees after the crisis
  • What not to say to employees
  • Building critical relationships as part of your plan development
  • How to instill a survivor mindset and increase the chances of survival with your team
  • Provide additional resources on a state-by-state basis that are OSHA approved

and more

Who Will Benefit:
  • Business Owners
  • Operators who do not have a dedicated security team
  • Novice and experienced HR Generalists
  • Administrative Assistants
  • Payroll staff
  • small business Administrative Assistants
Instructor:

Brenda Neckvatal Nominated for the Stevie's American Business Award and again for the Stevie’s International Business Award, Brenda is an experienced practicing Human Resource professional and business consultant with vast experiencing spanning 30 years. She has experience working for five Fortune 500 corporations, consulted over 450 C-Suite executives, and led the reformation of HR infrastructure within 400 small businesses. Driven with a high level of compassion for business operators, she engages in helping business leaders in all industries solve their complicated people problems.


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